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Defunct amusement parks in the United States
31,49 € *
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Defunct amusement parks in the United States ab 31.49 € als Taschenbuch: Hamel's Amusement Park Action Park Dogpatch USA Round Top Pennsylvania Six Flags Astroworld Wonderland Amusement Park White City Americana/Lesourdesville Lake Amusement Park Idora Park Youngstown Six Flags New Orleans. Aus dem Bereich: Bücher, Reise, Reiseführer, Nordamerika,

Anbieter: hugendubel
Stand: 25.10.2020
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Niagara-on-the-Lake
34,00 € *
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High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! Niagara-on-the-Lake (2001 population 13,839) is a Canadian town located in Southern Ontario where the Niagara River meets Lake Ontario in the Niagara Region of the southern part of the province of Ontario. It is located across the Niagara river from Youngstown, New York, USA. The original site was a Neutral Nation village known as Onghiara . In 1781 the British government established Butlersburg, which later became known as West Niagara. Many of the first white inhabitants were loyalists, loyal to Britain, who fled during and immediately after the American Revolution.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 25.10.2020
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Yankee Lake, Ohio
34,00 € *
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Yankee Lake is a village in Trumbull County, Ohio, in the United States. As of the 2000 census, the village population was 99. It is part of the Youngstown Warren Boardman, OH-PA Metropolitan Statistical Area. The community is served by the Brookfield (44403) post office. As of the census of 2000, there were 99 people, 40 households, and 31 families residing in the village. The population density was 180.4 people per square mile (69.5/km²). There were 41 housing units at an average density of 74.7/sq mi (28.8/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 100.00% White. There were 40 households out of which 30.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 70.0% were married couples living together, 2.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.5% were non-families. 22.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 2.90.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 25.10.2020
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Ohio: The History of a People
78,90 CHF *
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As the state of Ohio prepares to celebrate its bicentennial in 2003, Andrew R. L.Cayton offers an account of ways in which diverse citizens have woven its history. Ohio: The History of a People centers around the many stories Ohioans have told about life in their state. The founders of Ohio in 1803 believed that its success would depend on the development of a public culture that emphasized what its citizens had in common with each other. But for two centuries, the remarkably diverse inhabitants of Ohio have repeatedly asserted their own ideas about how they and their children should lead their lives. The state's public culture has consisted of many voices, sometimes in conflict with each other. Using memoris, diaries, letters, novels, and paintings, Cayton writes Ohio's history as a collective biography of its citizens. Ohio, he argues, lies at the intersection of the stories of James Rhodes and Toni Morrison, Charles Ruthenberg and Lucy Webb Hayes, Carl Stokes and Alice Cary, Sherwood Anderson and Pete Rose. It lies in the tales of German Jews in Cincinnati, Italian and Polish immigrants in Cleveland, Southern blacks and white Appalachians in Youngstown. Ohio is the mingled voices of farm families, steelworkers, ministers, writers, schoolteachers, reformers, and football coaches. Ohio, in short, is whatever its citizens have imagined it to be.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 25.10.2020
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The New Minority
23,90 CHF *
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It wasn't so long ago that the white working class occupied the middle of British and American societies. But today members of the same demographic, feeling silenced and ignored by mainstream parties, have moved to the political margins. In the United States and the United Kingdom, economic disenfranchisement, nativist sentiments and fear of the unknown among this group have even inspired the creation of new right-wing parties and resulted in a remarkable level of support for fringe political candidates, most notably Donald Trump. Answers to the question of how to rebuild centrist coalitions in both the U.S. and U.K. have become increasingly elusive. How did a group of people synonymous with Middle Britain and Middle America drift to the ends of the political spectrum? What drives their emerging radicalism? And what could possibly lead a group with such enduring numerical power to, in many instances, consider themselves a 'minority' in the countries they once defined? In The New Minority, Justin Gest speaks to people living in once thriving working class cities--Youngstown, Ohio and Dagenham, England--to arrive at a nuanced understanding of their political attitudes and behaviors. In this daring and compelling book, he makes the case that tension between the vestiges of white working class power and its perceived loss have produced the unique phenomenon of white working class radicalization.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 25.10.2020
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The New Minority
23,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

It wasn't so long ago that the white working class occupied the middle of British and American societies. But today members of the same demographic, feeling silenced and ignored by mainstream parties, have moved to the political margins. In the United States and the United Kingdom, economic disenfranchisement, nativist sentiments and fear of the unknown among this group have even inspired the creation of new right-wing parties and resulted in a remarkable level of support for fringe political candidates, most notably Donald Trump. Answers to the question of how to rebuild centrist coalitions in both the U.S. and U.K. have become increasingly elusive. How did a group of people synonymous with Middle Britain and Middle America drift to the ends of the political spectrum? What drives their emerging radicalism? And what could possibly lead a group with such enduring numerical power to, in many instances, consider themselves a 'minority' in the countries they once defined? In The New Minority, Justin Gest speaks to people living in once thriving working class cities--Youngstown, Ohio and Dagenham, England--to arrive at a nuanced understanding of their political attitudes and behaviors. In this daring and compelling book, he makes the case that tension between the vestiges of white working class power and its perceived loss have produced the unique phenomenon of white working class radicalization.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 25.10.2020
Zum Angebot
Ohio: The History of a People
44,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

As the state of Ohio prepares to celebrate its bicentennial in 2003, Andrew R. L.Cayton offers an account of ways in which diverse citizens have woven its history. Ohio: The History of a People centers around the many stories Ohioans have told about life in their state. The founders of Ohio in 1803 believed that its success would depend on the development of a public culture that emphasized what its citizens had in common with each other. But for two centuries, the remarkably diverse inhabitants of Ohio have repeatedly asserted their own ideas about how they and their children should lead their lives. The state's public culture has consisted of many voices, sometimes in conflict with each other. Using memoris, diaries, letters, novels, and paintings, Cayton writes Ohio's history as a collective biography of its citizens. Ohio, he argues, lies at the intersection of the stories of James Rhodes and Toni Morrison, Charles Ruthenberg and Lucy Webb Hayes, Carl Stokes and Alice Cary, Sherwood Anderson and Pete Rose. It lies in the tales of German Jews in Cincinnati, Italian and Polish immigrants in Cleveland, Southern blacks and white Appalachians in Youngstown. Ohio is the mingled voices of farm families, steelworkers, ministers, writers, schoolteachers, reformers, and football coaches. Ohio, in short, is whatever its citizens have imagined it to be.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 25.10.2020
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The New Minority
21,10 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

It wasn't so long ago that the white working class occupied the middle of British and American societies. But today members of the same demographic, feeling silenced and ignored by mainstream parties, have moved to the political margins. In the United States and the United Kingdom, economic disenfranchisement, nativist sentiments and fear of the unknown among this group have even inspired the creation of new right-wing parties and resulted in a remarkable level of support for fringe political candidates, most notably Donald Trump. Answers to the question of how to rebuild centrist coalitions in both the U.S. and U.K. have become increasingly elusive. How did a group of people synonymous with Middle Britain and Middle America drift to the ends of the political spectrum? What drives their emerging radicalism? And what could possibly lead a group with such enduring numerical power to, in many instances, consider themselves a 'minority' in the countries they once defined? In The New Minority, Justin Gest speaks to people living in once thriving working class cities--Youngstown, Ohio and Dagenham, England--to arrive at a nuanced understanding of their political attitudes and behaviors. In this daring and compelling book, he makes the case that tension between the vestiges of white working class power and its perceived loss have produced the unique phenomenon of white working class radicalization.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 25.10.2020
Zum Angebot
The New Minority
21,10 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

It wasn't so long ago that the white working class occupied the middle of British and American societies. But today members of the same demographic, feeling silenced and ignored by mainstream parties, have moved to the political margins. In the United States and the United Kingdom, economic disenfranchisement, nativist sentiments and fear of the unknown among this group have even inspired the creation of new right-wing parties and resulted in a remarkable level of support for fringe political candidates, most notably Donald Trump. Answers to the question of how to rebuild centrist coalitions in both the U.S. and U.K. have become increasingly elusive. How did a group of people synonymous with Middle Britain and Middle America drift to the ends of the political spectrum? What drives their emerging radicalism? And what could possibly lead a group with such enduring numerical power to, in many instances, consider themselves a 'minority' in the countries they once defined? In The New Minority, Justin Gest speaks to people living in once thriving working class cities--Youngstown, Ohio and Dagenham, England--to arrive at a nuanced understanding of their political attitudes and behaviors. In this daring and compelling book, he makes the case that tension between the vestiges of white working class power and its perceived loss have produced the unique phenomenon of white working class radicalization.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 25.10.2020
Zum Angebot